On motherhood: When God calls us to the river

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When I first felt God nudging me to write a contemporary story about Jochebed, Moses’ birth mother, I could not have felt more unqualified.

I’ve never given up a child.

I have no experience with crisis pregnancy or adoption or birth mothers.

Though none of my novels have been easy to write, more than ever I felt just like Moses must have when he pleaded with the Lord in Exodus 4:10:

“O Lord, I’m not very good with words. I never have been, and I’m not now, even though you have spoken to me. I get tongue-tied, and my words get tangled” (NLT).

Still, the story would not leave my mind.

I knew I had to write it.

I researched birth mothers and read blogs and books they have written. I visited adoption agencies. I talked to adoptive mothers. I read books about crisis pregnancy. Much of what went into Before I Saw You is the result of this research.

However, the heart of Before I Saw You emerged when I realized I had more in common with Jochebed than I originally thought…

click here to read the rest of this blog post, over at Tyndale House Publisher’s Crazy For Fiction site.

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When Home Feels like a Fixer-Upper

My husband and I stood and stared at the scalding hot water pouring onto the bare plywood floor of the bathroom we are remodeling. Neither of us knew how exactly to go about plugging a hole in a water main. Finally, the shock wore off. I grabbed nearby towels and stuffed them around the split copper pipe, and my husband ran to the basement to shut off the water. Thankfully, the plumber was scheduled to come the next day, and the neighborhood pool made a great stand-in for showers that evening.
Do-it-yourself projects look really easy, all smiles and shiplap, until something like this happens.

Read the rest of this story in More to Life Magazine by clicking here! 

i remember. a poem.


i remember

the wonder of not knowing 

people see me,

 bike riding to the village without

a care, because everything 

then was good.

maybe that’s the hardest part of watching

my sons grow up. Now

they’ll realize they have to be

careful. because the world is

harsh 

and it does not understand.