Home Sweet Farmhouse Home: Episode 4, Pallet Teen Twin Bed

Hey there, friends!

How many of you are here today because I said the word, PALLET?

That’s what I thought.

Thanks for visiting!

Many would argue that pallet projects are not really, technically, farmhouse style. But if you recall in my earlier blogs, I consider farmhouse anything that makes life simple and fun and can be accomplished on a budget.

So I hereby designate this pallet project as farmhouse chic.

I was inspired to make a bed frame for my teenager, who to date has been content to sleep on a mattress on the floor (his choice). Teenagers are funny creatures. I happen to have three of them and I adore them. But they can have interesting preferences.

Honestly, I didn’t care if he wanted to sleep on a mattress on the floor until I realized I was the one who’d be cleaning and changing sheets and vacuuming around it. That’s when the mattress on the floor became a problem for the mama. And mama has enough problems without that.

Boy was getting a bed frame.

Long story short, I decided on a pallet bed frame because I’ve always liked the look; I’d already made a headboard from pallets for another one of my teenagers; the cool teenager liked the industrial look; and it was CHEAP.

Like, almost guilt-inducing cheap.

Right around $60 cheap.

CAVEAT-FINE-PRINT-BUT-REALLY-LARGE-PRINT-WARNING: I am not an engineer or contractor or professional, so if you copy this project do so at your own risk. 

Supplies you’ll need:

  • two pallets, new as you can find. I got mine from our local hardware store that sells them to pallet freaks like me for $5 each.
  • three 8-foot 2×4’s
  • a box of 2 1/2 inch wood screws
  • a box of 1 inch wood screws
  • four, three-inch casters, at least one with a brake
  • paint or stain if desired

Tools you’ll need:

  • power drill
  • power sander
  • power reticulating saw
  • power circular saw
  • measuring tape
  • T-square

I measured the mattress, a twin, at approximately 72 inches.

Then, I laid the pallets out end-to-end and measured the total length. (NOTE: I’ve learned the hard way not to cut ANYTHING until you measure. In fact, DON’T DO ANYTHING AT ALL until you measure. Forget the nightmare that was high school geometry. Measuring is your friend. Because you’re always better off with too much than too little of anything.)

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This is where it gets FUN.

I ended up taking a couple of feet off one of the pallets to make the frame a couple of inches longer than the mattress.

You WILL need a reticulating saw for this. Trust me. I was all set to do this project with just my little old circular saw until I realized there’s a center piece within the pallet that a circular saw can’t reach. You’ll need the reticulating saw to sever this piece.

This is me.

And my reticulating saw.

Without make-up.

I’m not wearing any either.

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I asked my teenager to help me with the circular saw cuts to the pallets and the 2×4’s because as much as I love power tools, I’m a wee bit SCEEEEERED of the circulating saw.

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Here it is, all cut to size.

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Time to secure it all together with the 2×4’s.

I cut my 2×4’s a couple of inches shorter than the total length of the pallets because I didn’t want them showing. But you could make them the same length if you’d like.

You’ll need the long screws to put these in place.

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Once the 2x4s are on there, it’s time for the casters.

I love these casters. I got mine at Home Depot for about $4 each. They are 3-inches in diameter and swivel. (You definitely want swiveling casters. If you’ve ever picked a grocery cart with a wheel that doesn’t swivel, you know why.) Perfect for cleaning and vacuuming around, AND for frequent furniture moving habits of teenagers.

Make sure you get at least one with a brake on it, because–especially if you have wood floors–brakes are a good thing on a bed.

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Here they are, all put together.

Isn’t it fun?

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What’s NOT fun are the ridiculous amount of splinters on pallets.

They’re okay if you’re a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle, but not if you’re a teenager.

(Sorry–I couldn’t resist. I have three teenage BOYS. I love The Turtles! And in case you didn’t know, the oversized rat is named Splinter.)

Anyway, here’s where you’ll need the sander to sand and sand and sand some more.

You could paint the pallets after this stage, or leave it nekked.

The teenager decided to keep it nekked.

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Oh and I almost forgot to mention!

The extra section of pallet we cut off we were able to use as a headboard. 

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And here it is!

The great teenager pallet bed reveal!

The headboard is really nice for books.

Books like Lead Me Home. (I’ve heard it’s good.)


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Here’s the end of the bed with the caster that has the brake.

And there’s that book again!

The teenager must love it.

I bet you’d love it, too! (*wink*)

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Jaxson loves the new bed.

It’s much cozier than a mattress on the floor.

And mom can sweep up his fur easier.


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Look!

There’s a teenager now!

Already enjoying the new and improved bed!

I think he’s reading a really good book.

I think it’s called Lead Me Home.
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Oh, and for those of you visiting today who needed some FARM in this Home Sweet Home blog, here’s some new pictures I took over the holiday weekend at my cousin’s dairy farm, the inspiration behind Lead Me Home.

Lots of farm here.

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Oh, hi there, Sugar.

I WUUUUV you.

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This baby is so new she doesn’t have an ear tag yet.

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Here are some of the young ones, just hangin’ out.

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Whoah there girls! Plenty of copies of Lead Me Home for everyone, I promise!


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And here’s Tybalt to give you a kiss.
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Thanks so much for visiting the blog today!

Do tell, what projects have you been working on lately?

Have you ever tackled a pallet project?

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Unless the Lord builds the house,
    those who build it labor in vain.
Unless the Lord watches over the city,
    the watchman stays awake in vain.

Psalm 127:1

Home Sweet Farmhouse Home: Collections

Home is where the heart is.

That’s for sure.

I don’t know about you, but especially during these times of social uncertainty and unrest, I am finding a particular comfort in my home.

While my other Home Sweet Farmhouse Home posts have focused on projects, I wanted to write a little bit about collections. The sort of collections that make a home…well…home.

Luke 2:19 is one of my favorite verses in the Bible, and especially since becoming a mother:

“But Mary treasured up all these things, pondering them in her heart.”

So much love, so many memories were happening all around Mary when Jesus was born. She didn’t have a Creative Memories scrapbook consultant (I was one back in the 90’s!) down the street to help her save all the memorabilia, or a smart phone to document the visitors and events in real-time. So she pondered, cherished, and held the memories close in her heart. I’d be willing to bet she pocketed perhaps a smooth stone, a swatch of fabric from baby Jesus’ swaddling clothes, a snippet of wool from the sheep they shared the cave with.

Similarly, here are a few ways I’ve collected “memories on display,” if you will, in our home, visual reminders of travels and places and people we cherish:

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I love farms.

I love barns.

My ancestors were farmers, and several of my cousins still are today. Indeed, if you’ve read Lead Me Home then you know that my dairy-farming cousins were the inspiration behind this novel.

No wonder I collect paintings of barns.

These paintings in particular, belonged to a friend’s mother, so not only do they remind me of my heritage, they remind me of the special place from which they came as well.

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One of my dear friends, Sharon, painted this barn (below).

Isn’t it gorgeous?

You really should check out her work here. She’s pretty amazing.

All of my barn and farm paintings are in my dining room.

That’s one thing I’ve learned about decorating with collections: grouping things makes them stand out.

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Like these pretty glass jars.

I don’t have a particular memory associated with them, but I like them.

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Same thing with these vintage tablecloths.

Some of them belonged to my grandmother.

Others I’ve just collected over the years.

Putting them together in a little antique wire basket makes them look neat and special.

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I have two of these chicken egg crates, and I use them for books on my bookshelves.

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These rocks belonged to my grandfather, who was a hobby lapidarist. He cut and polished these himself.

He was also the inspiration behind my novel, Then Sings My Soul.

Keeping these beauties in a cigar box in the basement wasn’t doing them any good.

Now they are front-and-center on my mantle in a bowl I found at Goodwill.

I smile and remember Grandpa’s glee at showing us a new stone he’d been working on each time I walk by these.

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Sea shells!

Who doesn’t have a few of these around from a trip to the beach?

We love our trips to the beach. The vase of cotton sprigs and these shells, all together in a cake stand, remind me of steamy southern nights on the Alabama gulf coast.

No wonder I was inspired to set my first novel, How Sweet the Sound, in southeast Alabama.

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This painting also belonged to my grandpa, the lapidarist. He spent a lot of time on Lake Michigan, and I am sure he liked having this in his home to remind him of the lakeshore when he couldn’t be there.

This also inspired me to set Then Sings My Soul in South Haven, Michigan.

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The glass lamps have beach pebbles and pieces of driftwood in them that my family and I collected during our own trip to South Haven, Michigan.

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I hope you’ve enjoyed seeing some of the ways I’ve used collections in my home sweet home.

What do you collect?

How have you used collections in your home?

May the Lord bless your home and the precious memories you ponder today and always.

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So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self  is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day.  For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal. 2 Corinthians 4:16-18 (ESV)

What does home sound and look like to you? #LeadMeHomeNovel contest and book giveaway! 


As summer slowly rolls into the Midwest, it always makes me think of lazy afternoons on the front porch with the sounds of my family milling about in the backyard.

What does home sound and look like to you?

Share a photo that represents HOME for you, and be entered to win the grand prize of this beautiful ‘Home Sweet Home’ sign and a copy of Lead Me Home, my new novel. FIVE other lucky winners will receive a copy of the novel. 

Visit my Facebook page now for rules on how to enter and details!